Well friends, I had it all planned out.  Today’s email was going to be the play-by-play of my dream day.  No, not a “Date with the head cheerleader” day, but the day that I took the field at Angel Stadium and lived out a childhood dream to be a Major League Baseball Player.  Ok, here is the short version– 3 hits, 2 runs scored, 2 runs batted in, 1 stolen base… oh yeah, and a 22-8 victory…

 No, that all changed after I noticed something about my entertainment choices for the weekend.  I saw two seemingly dissimilar movies this weekend (on DVD; come on people, I have a 4 year old, I don’t go to movies anymore!).  I saw “Inglorious Basterds” from Quentin Tarantino and “Defiance” starring James Bond himself, Daniel Craig.  You may not be familiar with the latter film– it was based on the true story of a family of Jewish brothers in World War II Russia who found a way to rise up against the Germans and survive through to the end of the war, in the process saving over 1,000 Jews from being transported to the camps.

 “Basterds,” by comparison, was a fantasy film, a reversal of fortune, where a small cadre of Jewish soldiers unites for one purpose… “Killing Nazis.” 

 Well, one was obviously a tongue-in-cheek comic book-ish re-write of history and the other was a “little man defies the odds” true story.  While both dealt with Jews fighting back, I found a more compelling similarity between films.  They both dealt with a small band of people who became so powerful and feared that entire armies were dedicated to eliminating them.  Can you believe it, in both films, the legend of these small bands of soldiers reached the upper echelons of the military that mountains were moved to find and eradicate them?

 So it got me to thinking… can one person really make a difference?  History is filled with people like this.  Whether it was John Brown and his fellow abolitionists at Harper’s Ferry, Oskar Schindler and Raoul Wallenberg in World War II, or Harvey Milk (thanks Sean Penn!), history is rife with people just like you and me who made a difference.  And they didn’t do it for the accolades, they didn’t do it for the money, and they certainly didn’t do it so that they would be written about in history books.  They did it because they had the conviction and the determination to be leaders, to be defiant, to be glorious.  (Sorry Quentin, there was nothing inglorious about them.) 

 Where does that leave us?  I really don’t know.  Do I have it in me to be that leader, that game-changer, that hero?  I know a lot of you do…

 Rob!  Quit with the hero worship!!  Sorry, I can’t.  What can I say, I like it when the good guys win, and sometimes, they do so against insurmountable odds…

 This week I am thinking about how I can make a difference.  Who is with me?

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